Book review – The Witch’s Kiss trilogy by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr

Knowing my love of all things witchy, my sister gave me a copy of The Witch’s Kiss for my 19th birthday. I fell in love with Merry straight away. Who doesn’t love a great teenage witch? Katharine and Elizabeth are such a great writing team and wonderful people that I was able to meet via Twitter. Their banter, wit and love for each other shine through the characters they created in The Witch’s Kiss.

‘Witches do not kneel.’

I have read a lot of novels about witches and I think (nearly) all of them have a strongly feminist element. History has handed down tales of persecution of witches as our patriarchal society has attempted to control and subdue women. Witches represent the ultimate rebellion against patriarchy. They are strong, independent women that made the men of history afraid because they couldn’t be controlled. So they killed them in great numbers, even those that weren’t witches (and yes, many men as well!). The Witch’s Kiss touches on these themes with a cleverly executed blend of fairy tale and modern witch story. Katharine and Elizabeth create a world that is completely believable, while retaining classic fairy tale triangle of witches, princes and an evil wizard. Equally believable is the main character of the novel, Merry, a teenage girl in modern England that just happens to be a witch and descendant of the medieval witch, Meredith.

Merry was dreaming about blood.’

Merry dreams, she swears, thinks her brother is a pain in the neck, struggles to finish her homework, is messy, restless, spends hours texting and playing games on her phone, has trouble controlling her magic. I love novels that make you identify with the characters, and Merry’s red hair and quirky ways had me identifying with her straight away.

Gwydion ran his finger under the collar of his tunic, and wished he could stop sweating.’

Gwydion is the evil wizard and a totally despicable villain. But we see he has a vulnerable side as well. The novel reveals the sequence of events that turns Gwydion evil, not that this excuses his subsequent behaviour in any way but helps our understanding. In many ways, the evil character in a fairy tale is a metaphor for bad relationships and the way many men turn to physical or verbal violence when things don’t go their way. Gwydion was the son of a former slave, mocked by the castle’s servants, angry and powerless, scheming for revenge. This is a revenge that plays out over a very long time, eventually centuries. Gwydion is so bent on revenge it twists everything he does until he is so consumed by it the original hurt hardly seems justification any longer.

Jack? Jack!Where are you, lad?’

Jack is the King of Hearts. Forced to become Gwydion’s evil servant he is actually the son of the King and the Queen. Cursed by Gwydion as a baby, Jack is hidden away and raised as a commoner. Of course, he is the love interest for Merry but I don’t feel we really get to know Jack. We are led to believe he has a good heart but all his actions are controlled by Gwydion. Is this just an excuse? Another metaphor for male behaviour in relationships? I think so. Merry, though, falls in love with Jack and sees the good in him. Maybe her love can so him. Poor, naïve girl!

‘Leo was home by early afternoon.’

Leo is a foil for Merry. Her brother is very close to her even though they fight all the time. He isn’t magical but he supports Merry’s journey, having her back all the way even though he is dealing with his own issues. One of those is Leo’s search for love that doesn’t involve a fairy tale prince, but really he is searching for his own prince. He doesn’t find love in the fairy tale world and his issues are firmly planted in the real world. This is kind of interesting because traditional fairy tales didn’t treat being gay as a problem to be overcome but the real world does. When he does find love it just feels so right and natural (sorry, jumping ahead two novels!).

The Witch’s Kiss

The Witch’s Kiss is an amazing young adult novel that creates great characters and a truly believable world. The plot is intriguing enough to make you want to keep turning pages and there are enough twists to keep any teenage girl happy.

The Witch’s Tears

The Witch’s Tears was a wonderful follow-up to the first novel. We get to learn more about the characters and how they dealt with the emotional turns from the events of The Witch’s Kiss. If I had one complaint (and it’s a small one) it’s that The Witch’s Tears reminded me of The Empire Strikes Back. This is often a problem with middle books in a trilogy where the events are setting up the action and climax to come in the third story. I don’t think you could read The Witch’s Tears without having read the first and third novels. Then again, maybe that is what makes a great trilogy.

The Witch’s Blood

Last night I finished reading The Witch’s Blood and OMG!! There is more at stake, it’s possibly more exciting and the end left me crying! Merry knows what she can do now, but should she? Her community is against her and can her actions be justified because she is saving the people she loves? How is that different to Ronan’s actions? There is a blurry moral ground here. I also liked the environmental theme running through The Witch’s Blood. Merry’s magic – like modern consumption – comes at a cost to the land and eventually she has to make a choice.

I don’t usually do this in a review but I want to thank Katharine and Elizabeth Corr for being such wonderful people and taking the time to talk to an ordinary Australian girl. The Witch’s Kiss, The Witch’s Tears and The Witch’s Blood are definitely among my favourite books of all time and I will always treasure them.